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Optimising food demand and supply for Qatar

Optimising food demand and supply for Qatar

It will come as no surprise to anyone who regularly shops in Qatar’s supermarkets to hear that over 90% of the food on the shelves is imported from abroad, making the country extremely vulnerable to price hikes, embargoes, and supply disruptions. Taking control of the food supply chain is known as ‘food security’, and it’s one of the most important challenges facing Qatar in the coming years.

That’s the view of Dr. Samsul Huda of the University of Western Sydney, Australia, who is head of a multidisciplinary international team examining how best to use Qatar’s resources to maximize domestic crop productivity within Qatar, but also looking at land purchasing and contract farming in resource-rich countries in temperate and tropical climates in Africa, Asia, and Australasia.


Molecular simulation keeps oil flowing at home and abroad

Molecular simulation keeps oil flowing at home and abroad

Hydrates are a big problem in the oil and gas processing industries. Hydrates are ice-like crystalline materials which use the unusual environment within a pipe (high pressure and low temperature) to form on the inside of the pipes used to carry hydrocarbons. They are usually composed of water molecules and ‘guest’ vapour, such as methane. These hydrate solids grow to such a size that they impede and ultimately block the flow of oil or LNG.

A group working at Texas A&M University at Qatar (TAMUQ) and led by Dr. Ioannis Economou, has gone back to basics to try and solve this problem, by using computational molecular dynamics. Theoretical concepts are applied to various molecules and mixtures of molecules, then supercomputers predict how these molecules and mixtures may perform at various temperatures and pressures within a pipe.


Ancient technology updated to keep buildings cool

Ancient technology updated to keep buildings cool

A team of researchers in Qatar and the UK are adapting cooling technology from ancient Babylon for use in modern buildings. The passive, energy-efficient system is based on the principle of indirect evaporative cooling and aims to make the urban environment of desert cities more sustainable.

The future of information transmission is bright at TAMUQ

The future of information transmission is bright at TAMUQ

A prolific worldwide team of researchers, headquartered at Texas A&M University at Qatar, using theoretical physics and mathematics to model various signal processing systems in an effort to design better, faster and more powerful computer systems, have recently published their 100th paper on the topic.